Books
by Stephen Vizinczey

Truth & Lies in Literature

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Truth & Lies in Literature

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Reviews | Excerpt | to buy click line

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If Only Book Info

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If Only is the new novel by the author of In Praise of Older Women and An innocent Millionaire.
7 million copies of Stephen Vizinczey's books were sold worldwide.

There is so much here it is hard to know where to begin. A high comedy of magic and revenge on earth and in the heavens, IF ONLY seduces the reader into a landscape as recognisable as today's business pages and as credibly fantastical as Swift or Mark "F,vain. Jim, the compromised hero, is, like Voltaire's Candide, a foreigner wherever he goes.

Stephen Vizinczey is razor-sharp and fiercely funny as he describes Jim's adventures in the worlds Of Old and new money, where the cruelty of ruthless idiots is justified in defence of rewarded greed. Nightmares and visions unravel in translucent, witty prose. Along the way, he shows pity in unexpected places and con-sistently fights the fight on behalf of the universally threatened: classical music, marriage, lit-eracy and children. Admirers ofVizinczeys novels and essays have waited a long time for a third novel to match In Praise of Older Women and An Innocent Millionaire, and this, triumphantly.

The book "If Only" will hopefully be printed on the 17th of June and I am told it will be delivered by the 21st of June. They are printing a restricted hard cover edition of 100 copies only for collectors and supporters for £120.00 and the paperback for edition of 5000 copies each at £14.99 and also an ebook edition for £9.99.
Anyone who is interested can order directly from thehappyfew@btinternet.com with 20% reduction and no delivery charge to UK addresses. For European addresses outside the UK postal charges will be £5.60 as of present. International mailing charges i.e. outside Europe will be £7.50 at present.
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Reviews for

Truth & Lies in Literature

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MICHAEL RATCLIFFE
IF ONLY is beautifully written and utterly compulsive. The opening is brilliant and Neb is a wonderful invention. I normally hate everything one can call science fiction but Neb works beautifully, mainly because he's funny. The novel as whole is dark and bitter. Swift and other great satirists would approve. Your description of modern corporate life is masterly. The ghastly Norton sums up everything one hates. As for Ward Bunting. I say dark and bitter (there is a lot of tragedy and unhappiness) but like all good faily stories it ends happily.

CHRISTOPHER SINCLAIR-STEVENSON
Golden remarks and passages are scattered liberally through the text. The chapters about Comet
Claudina and Jim Taylor's drowning are particularly fine. A Swiftian satire for the hedge fund age. The narrative seems nailed to the floor, highly realistic about people losing their jobs, to the point where an escape from sordid reality makes an impact, and the second part of the book soars suddenly skywards. The mixture of harsh truths and escapist fantasy is unique and beguil-ing.

GEORGE WALDEN
I discovered Vizinczey in a bookstore in Strasbourg and was so fascinated rhat I wanted to become his Italian publisher. Vizinuey has a rare gift: He is able to blend disparate threads of the plot, never uses a word too many; he is incisive and profound; he describes men and, even more impressively, women with a few memorable brush strokes. His new, moving tale is, again, rich in both irony and emotion.


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An Excerpt from

Truth & Lies in Literature

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